Highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

I’ve already shared my top picks from the Stockholm Furniture Fair, so today I want to focus on the highlights of wider Stockholm Design Week.

First held in 2002, Design Week takes place to coincide with the fair and has grown larger and larger each year. This time around was the biggest yet, with more than 400 events across the city – everything from pop-up exhibitions and talks to open studios and showroom tours. Here’s a look at a few of my favourites…

Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf – ‘Spatial Sensibilities’

I’m starting with what was possibly the highlight of my entire time in Stockholm – an exhibition from Copenhagen-based Frama in the newly renovated apartment of architect Andreas Martin-Löf.

The space itself was stunning. Located in a modernist building in the Kungsholmen neighbourhood, it had wide windows framing views out over the frozen water (temperatures in Stockholm dropped to -15C during my stay!) and an unusual mirrored ceiling that bounced light into every corner. I particularly loved the minimalist kitchen with its sleek matte-grey units, and the crittall-style double doors connecting it to the living room beyond.

Just as impressive were the Frama pieces on show, which included a few new additions: the ‘Farmhouse’ trestle table, new versions of the ‘Rivet’ side table, and the ‘A.M.L’ stool (designed by Andreas Martin-Löf himself). My eye was immediately drawn to the handcrafted ‘Otto’ stoneware, which combines a simple Scandinavian aesthetic with delicately speckled glazes. I was also very taken with a new chair design by Elding Oscarson that looked a little familiar, and I soon realised why: it was first created for the wonderful Skissernas Museum in Lund, southern Sweden, which I visited back in 2017. It’s a beautifully elegant and understated piece, so it’s great to see it now going into general production.

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Spatial Sensibilities' by Frama & Andreas Martin-Löf - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence – ‘The Fenix Palace’

One of the biggest talking points of Stockholm Design Week 2018 was a joint exhibition from Japanese furniture brand Ariake, Swedish lighting company Wästberg and interiors magazine My Residence (you can see my post about it here), so I was very excited to learn that they’d teamed up again this year. And I wasn’t disappointed.

Called ‘The Fenix Palace’ in honour of the venue – a former dance hall and entertainment space which closed its doors in 1940 – it was beautifully curated by My Residence editor-in-chief Hanna Nova Beatrice and stylist Annaleena Leino. The wooden panelling and ornate plasterwork provided a wonderful backdrop for Ariake’s minimalist pieces, which were created by international designers such as Norm Architects and Staffan Holm and which combine Scandinavian and Japanese influences. I particularly loved the table set-ups, which sat beneath Wästberg’s striking oversized ‘W151’ pendant lamps, and the screen-fronted ‘Kumiko’ cabinets, artfully styled with sculptures and ceramics.

The dark interiors made the exhibition quite tricky to photograph so the below images don’t really do it justice, but trust me when I say it was very atmospheric and truly inspiring!

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'The Fenix Palace' from Ariake, Wästberg & My Residence - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

DUX & Norm Architects – ‘Into the Light’

Another fantastic installation came from Swedish brand DUX, which is largely known outside Scandinavia for its beds but which also produces a raft of other furniture. It has just announced a new collaboration with Norm Architects and so the two companies teamed up to curate a joint exhibition called ‘Into the Light’.

Hosted at stylish co-working space and members’ club Alma, the event focused on the transition between contrasts, offsetting strong lines with soft fabrics in soothing shades of beige, grey and taupe. The star of the show was undoubtedly the first piece created for the collaboration: a wood and textile headboard which draws inspiration from Japan and Scandinavia. Both it and the wider exhibition were beautiful, and I can’t wait to see what else this exciting partnership brings!

'Into the Light' by Dux & Norm Architects - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Into the Light' by Dux & Norm Architects - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Into the Light' by Dux & Norm Architects - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Into the Light' by Dux & Norm Architects - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Into the Light' by Dux & Norm Architects - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Into the Light' by Dux & Norm Architects - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Into the Light' by Dux & Norm Architects - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Liljenkrantz for Kvänum

Also blending Japanese and Scandinavian elements was a new kitchen design from Louise Liljenkrantz for Kvänum, which was launched at its Stockholm showroom during Design Week. I have confess that I didn’t really know much about this Swedish company before, but I was really impressed with its collection of kitchens and other cabinetry, available in a range of contemporary and traditional styles and made using sustainably sourced wood.

The new design was first created for an apartment which Louise was refurbishing, but it proved so popular that she approached Kvänum about putting it into wider production. The result is a striking mix of clean lines and richly hued oak which she describes as ‘Victorian manor goes Japan’. It looks fantastic offset by grey stone, and the detailing – leather draw liners, built-in seating – is beautiful. There are also optional open shelves and glass-fronted cabinets, which are ideal for displaying favourite items and which would add a cosy, less utilitarian touch to open-plan spaces.

Liljenkrantz for Kvänum - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Liljenkrantz for Kvänum - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Liljenkrantz for Kvänum - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Liljenkrantz for Kvänum - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Liljenkrantz for Kvänum - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Liljenkrantz for Kvänum - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Liljenkrantz for Kvänum - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Iittala – ‘Creating Atmospheres (When Eating Becomes Form)’

Last but not least is Finnish brand Iittala, which took over the Wetterling Gallery to showcase its new ‘Raami’ tableware range, created by Jasper Morrison. I covered the collection in my last ‘new finds’ post, so it was great to see it in person. What’s more, it was accompanied by a fascinating exhibition exploring the concept of eating and how the behaviour and social customs associated with it shape design. It included a look at what defines the implements we use when we dine, and how eating has changed over the years. There was even a glimpse into how the ‘Raami’ collection is made, with a display of the moulds used and a video showing a glass carafe being hand-blown.

'Creating Atmospheres' by Iittala - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Creating Atmospheres' by Iittala - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Creating Atmospheres' by Iittala - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

'Creating Atmospheres' by Iittala - highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 | These Four Walls blog

Most photography by Abi Dare; Kvänum images one-five via the brand itself

The post Highlights from Stockholm Design Week 2019 appeared first on These Four Walls.


RUIN RETREAT

Not far from Stockholm, in the dreamy archipelago (of which I have such romantic dreams) stands this beautiful residence; Ruin Retreat. Yep I could easily spend some time here.

Architect: Lowen Widman
Photography: Erik Lefvander


Home tour | A Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

It’s time for another home tour and today I have a stunning house from the cathedral city of Salisbury in Wiltshire, southwest England, to show you. It’s owned by Irene and Sammy, the duo behind Instagram feed @nordicllar, and it blends pared-back Scandinavian style with influences from their Catalan and British roots (llar, by the way, is the Catalan word for ‘home’). It’s also a great example of slow, sustainable decorating, as Irene and Sammy have taken time to create carefully considered spaces that work for them and their lifestyle, with a wonderful mix of investment pieces and more affordable items.

The results really are beautiful, so I caught up with the couple to find out more about their approach, where they find inspiration and their top interior-design tips…

Hi Irene and Sammy! Please can you start by telling us a bit about yourselves? 

Irene: “We’ve been together for just over eight years. We come from different backgrounds but met at university, where we both studied film production. I’m originally from Barcelona while Sammy’s home town is a lovely little place called Romsey in Hampshire, so we feel very lucky that our paths crossed and we ended up where we are now! Sammy now works in marketing and graphic design for a health-supplement company, and I’m a wedding videographer.”

Where’s home, and how long have you lived there?

Irene: “Home is a two-bedroom terraced house in Salisbury, which was built in the 1920s. We bought it just over two years ago, but it definitely feels like we’ve been there a lot longer than that!”

How would you describe your interiors style?

Irene: “Before buying we rented a few places around Salisbury and our style was very eclectic. I’m a keen DIY-er and I used to make all sorts of decorations and bits of furniture, always opting for strong colours. Our current style couldn’t be further from that, though! We aim for a clean, bright aesthetic and we love keeping things as simple as possible – we like to think of it as minimal, but with a cosy and ‘lived-in’ touch. Minimalism has become such a buzz word and I don’t think it would be fair to call our style truly minimal, as there’s way too much stuff in our home! But we love to plan and arrange rooms with functionality and design in mind.”

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Irene and Sammy’s bedroom is simple and uncluttered, with soothing shades and relaxed linens. The wall lamp is from IKEA and the shelf is by Muuto. 

Where do you find inspiration for your home?

Irene: “Instagram has become a big source of inspiration for us. I occasionally scroll through Pinterest if we’re working on a specific project (like when we renovated our bathroom), but magazines are also important. Some of our favourites are Cereal, Kinfolk, Drift and Rum – not just for home and design inspiration, but also for lifestyle and travel.”

What’s your favourite part of your home and why?

Sammy: “My favourite space tends to shift between a few rooms, partly depending on whether they’re tidy or not. I’m a bit of a neat freak, whereas Irene seems to unintentionally leave a trail of mess behind her! However, she has a clear vision and knows what she wants, whereas I can be a little indecisive at times, so we complement each other very well. I particularly love our bathroom, which we renovated last year – the monochrome colour palette makes it such a calming space to relax in after a long day.”

Irene: “At the moment I’m loving our home office, which has become such a lovely space since we shifted a few things around, although our open-plan living and dining area will always be my favourite part of the house. When we rented, these two spaces were always separate, so we would spend time in one of them and the other room would be empty all the time. Things like that really make you think about design and the way the structure of a house can affect your lifestyle, so having that little bit of open-plan living makes me very happy!”

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

The couple have recently renovated their bathroom, creating a sophisticated monochrome scheme. They made the wooden bath tray from a section of old floorboard, and the rustic texture provides a wonderful element of contrast. 

And your favourite piece of furniture?

Sammy: “I can’t pick one so I’ll pick two. The first is our sofa from Made.com. It was one of the first things we invested in when we bought the house, and I love the tones and button detailing. From a practicality point of view, it’s so comfy and the perfect shape. The second is our ‘Airy’ coffee table from Muuto. I love that it was handmade to order, and that it’s very simple but equally effective in its form and functionality.”

Irene: “I treated myself to the ‘WM String’ lounge chair from Menu for my birthday last year and it’s my absolute favourite. I love the fact that it’s understated and very stylish. Plus it works indoors and out!”

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

The living room is open-plan yet cosy and contains many of the couple’s favourite pieces, including the ‘VM String’ lounge chair and ‘Airy’ coffee table. The beautiful vase on the dining table is from Swedish brand Lindform. 

Where do you like to source items for your home – any favourite brands or shops?

Sammy: “Our favourite brands include HAY, Muuto, Meraki, House Doctor, Menu, Cooee Design, Aesop, H&M Home, Made.com, Ikea, Lindform, The Organic company and Arket. Shop-wise, we source a lot of items from Scandinavian Design Centre, Trouva and Nunido.”

Do you have any future plans for your home? 

Sammy: “We’re always thinking of ways we can change and improve things. Two big projects that we eventually want to undertake are the living-room floorboards and the kitchen. The floorboards are lovely and have a lot of sentimental value for us, as they were the first thing we did when we moved in. Irene was adamant that she wanted exposed floorboards and we’re so glad we took the plunge and pulled up the old carpet. However, the warm tones don’t really sit with the colour palette we’ve since created, and we can’t decide whether to re-treat the wood or lay down new flooring entirely.

“As for the kitchen, it’s well made and works from a functionality point of view, but it’s not really in keeping with our aesthetic. One can dream!”

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Home tour - a Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury | These Four Walls blog

Irene and Sammy have just rejigged their home office, creating a calm and organised workspace. The metal and glass sideboard sits downstairs and provides the perfect spot for displaying flowers and favourite magazines. 

Finally, what’s your top interior-design tip?

Irene: “Try not to get carried away by trends. We used to find new trends exciting and felt like we had to keep up with what was ‘in’ at the time, but I think that’s something that tends to happen when you’re still trying to find your own style. Now we’re less impulsive when we buy anything and always ask “will we still love this in five years’ time?”. It means most of the items we now own are things that are useful and that we love aesthetically. Owning a home is such a learning curve – we’re still getting rid of ‘trendy’ items we bought two years ago and investing in long-lasting pieces instead. Most importantly, choose items and furniture that are likely to evolve with you and (without meaning to sound too Marie Kondo!) serve a purpose but also bring you joy.”

Thanks Irene and Sammy!

See more of Irene and Sammy’s beautiful home on Instagram

All photography by Irene Piera

The post Home tour | A Scandinavian-inspired house in Salisbury appeared first on These Four Walls.


Very Exciting news! Plus Win a Room Design!

Guys! I have some exciting news to share with you. Last January I sent out a survey to find out what you'd like to see more of on My Scandinavian Home - and I received so many wonderful, helpful replies! I noticed many said that although you enjoyed the inspiration, you still sometimes feel a little stuck with how to arrange a room, which colours to choose, or simply how to complete the look in a beautiful way (don't I know that feeling!). I also receive a flood of mails each week asking for similar advice. So, I put on my thinking cap.

One of the key philosophies of Scandinavian design is that everyone should have access to good design. And I felt the same should be the case with interior design.

So, on 1st March I am launching a new, affordable My Scandinavian Home online interior design service from this fab studio. For a small fee, the small team of highly qualified, passionate, über talented Scandinavian interior designers are waiting to help you pretty much wherever you are in the world!

All you'd need to do is fill in a simple online form about the room you'd like decorate and complete a fun style survey on the bus home from work or from the comfort of your sofa.  One of the members of the team will then contact you to discuss your needs, before sending you a room layout, moodboard and product list (if required) so you can get decorating and create the room of your dreams!

GIVE-AWAY
Since I am really keen for this service to be as smooth and helpful as possible for you, I need two wonderful people to test the My Scandinavian home interior design service before the launch. All we would like in return, is your feedback! Sound good?

To enter:

- Let us know in the comment section or on instagram or Facebook which room you would like to redecorate and why.

The two winners will be announced here and on instagram and Facebook on Sunday 24th February. This give-away is open to everyone!

I hope you feel as excited as I am! We're so looking forward to helping you transform your home, one room at a time!

Niki

PS It's half term in Sweden next week so I am going to be giving my husband and little girls my full screen-free attention - do you think they'll recognise me?!  I won't be blogging but I might just sneak on to instagram stories from time to time (yes, I know, but!). I hope you have a really lovely, relaxing week too! 


Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous

Advertisement – this post features gifted items, but all words and opinions are my own

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

I’ve been really pleased with the way our living room has looked and felt since we finished our makeover project last year, but until recently one final touch was missing: the right window dressings.

Like many Victorian houses, our living room has a bay window that’s very tricky to deal with. Curtains never looked quite right, as you can see in the photo below – they hung awkwardly and seemed to cut the bay off from the rest of the room. What’s more, finding a stylish curtain pole to fit the angles proved impossible. I’ve always loved the pared-back look of leaving windows bare (very common in Scandinavia), but that wasn’t an option either as the window faces the street and anyone walking past can look straight in.

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

After giving it a lot of thought, I decided that wooden window shutters would be the best solution for balancing light, privacy and aesthetics, and so I turned to the experts at Shutterly Fabulous for help. This wonderfully named company has been installing top-quality, well-priced shutters across the UK since 2002. It was also one of the first shutter providers to be recognised by the Guild of Master Craftsmen, so the team really do know their stuff.

The process began with a free home visit from Shutterly Fabulous’ local design consultant Tim, who talked me through the various options and brought along samples for me to look at. I hadn’t realised there were so many different types of shutter on offer: full-height shutters, tier-on-tier shutters with separate top and bottom sections, café-style shutters that cover the lower half of the window only… You can also choose between hardwood or more affordable but no less pretty ‘basswood’, select the slat width, and decide whether to have visible push rods or hidden mechanisms to open and close the louvres. There’s even a waterproof polyvinyl option for bathrooms!

After chatting through the possibilities, I decided to go for full-height shutters in crisp white to match the window frames, with concealed push mechanisms for a cleaner, more minimalist look. I also opted for a mid-rail that lines up with the mid frame of each window pane, allowing the upper and lower slats to be opened and closed independently of each other. I briefly toyed with the idea of tier-on-tier shutters, but the shape of our bay means there would be no way to open the top sections and have them sit flat against the wall, so we’d only end up banging our heads on them when we stood up from the sofa!

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Tim then took exact measurements, and it was reassuring to know that the shutters would be custom-made to fit our windows perfectly. He also assured me that our house’s wonky proportions and crooked walls (a feature of so many older properties) wouldn’t cause any issues whatsoever, as the Shutterly Fabulous team are carefully trained to deal with them.

A few weeks later the shutters were ready, and Tim returned to install them. The process was surprisingly quick and hassle-free, and within a couple of hours I was admiring the finished results.

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

The shutters have been in place for just over two months now and they’ve had a massive impact on the overall look and feel of the living room. We no longer have to choose between light and privacy, and we can easily adjust the slats as needed. We often open them fully during the day, but if the sun gets too strong we can tilt them to prevent glare, meaning we always have wonderfully soft, even light across the whole space. In the evenings we tend to close them fully to create a cosy feel, and on weekend mornings, when we like to laze around in our pyjamas, we can close the lower slats but leave the upper ones open. What’s more, without curtains framing the bay and drawing the eye to the end of the room, it seems so much larger and airier.

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

I think the shutters are going to prove very useful in different seasons, too. At the moment they help to insulate the bay and keep in warmth, whereas in spring and summer we’ll be able to open the windows behind and let fresh air filter in through the slats. And there’s no longer any risk of our cat jumping through the open window onto the road – a constant worry in our pre-shutter days!

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous | These Four Walls blog

To book a free appointment with one of Shutterly Fabulous’ design consultants, click here. Our shutters were kindly gifted for the purposes of this post, but prices start from £299 per sqm.  

All photography by Abi Dare

The post Made-to-measure window shutters from Shutterly Fabulous appeared first on These Four Walls.


Embracing The Blues In The Fabulous Danish Home of Michael Schmidt

There's no mistaking Michael Schmidt's favourite colour. The thirty year old Danish creative consultant and business owner (with a background in fashion and interiors) acquired his 74 sqm  (796 sq ft) apartment six years ago as a student. "It had more space than I needed, but I fell completely in love with it's quirky layout and the great location - it's literally a few metres down the street from the Copenhagen lakes in the lively Nørrebro area." Michael has shared the apartment with various flatmates and partners, but today lives alone giving him a free hand on how he decorates the bedroom, dining room, living room, kitchen and bathroom. Not only is the home full of bold, yet harmonious contrast, it's also full of fascinating collector's items including art, design classics and sculptural pieces. I caught up with Michael to find out a little more about his wonderful, colourful Copenhagen home! 


Rhythm & Blues Dhurrie rug, teak credenza*, Knoll diamond chair*, vase by Helle Mardahl (seen in top picture)

How did the apartment look when you first bought it?
It actually had a lot of colour in each room - but a mix of purple, red, terracotta and beige - far from my liking! So I started from scratch by renovating it and painting everything white to create a blank canvas.

When did you start adding colour?
Over the years I have added more and more colour, as I feel it can be a great way to highlight different things. My apartment is very long, with an extended view through three rooms so I decided to highlight this by painting one wall in each room in three different colours, which elongates the layout even more. 
Art by Fabian Treiber, Karl Monies, Vintage poster from Vintage Cph
In what other ways has colours helped to create the atmosphere you were looking for?
I have a very small kitchen and it looked a bit dull in white, so I opted for a rich green to give the room a moody expression. People tend to be frightened of adding colour to small spaces but it can actually bring them to life in a totally new way.
How else have you added colour to your home?
Of course colour in the home is not only about walls, it's about furniture, accessories and art. Art especially can create a unique mix of colours in every room - I buy all my art from the heart, but I do think about how it would fit into my home, how it will work with the other colours, the light etc. 


Eiermann2 table, Montana shelves, VP Globe pendant* Photo by Martin Solyst

I notice you also have some fabulous, bold textiles!
I find another great way to add colour is with rich fabrics such as curtains or cushions. I have collected a number of cushions by designer Raf Simons for Kvadrat - his eye for colour and texture is amazing.

What are your go-to colours - I guess blue...?!
Blue is one of my favourite colours, as demonstrated. by my wardrobe and home! But I try to be careful not to overdo it with one colour, so I add a lot of green, grey and some red to my interior as well. I love to create a contrast between a green wall and a red shelf, or a blue wall and yellow vases. Maybe it sounds like a loud combination, but I spend a lot of time finding the exact shades to create contrast but maintain a calm atmosphere. Most of the colours I choose have a dusty tone. 
Poster from Louisiana museum, painting by Michael's great grandfather, Strøm Collection vase / jug

Where do you find inspiration for colour combinations?
One of my biggest inspirations is the Bauhaus movement. It is known for its functional design and use of primary colours like red and blue which help to highlight function and form. When I started painting the walls in my home, I made a collage of five Vilhelm Lundstrøm paintings, which gave me ideas on how to combine contrasting colours in a harmonious way. 
Recently we've been admiring the colourful Danish homes of Celine Hallas, Sofie Amalie and Trine Brunsvig. Do you think we'll see more and more colour in Danish homes? If so, what do you think is behind this movement?
I think Danish homes are much more colourful than they were ten years ago. The internet and social media provide amazing inspiration from all over the world. I also think Scandinavian countries have always created trend-forward homes, so why wouldn't they be adventurous with colour as too?  
Do you think the way Scandinavians use bolder colours differs from other parts of the world?
I think the shades of colours will be tailored to our climate, our light and our way of living - so even a colourful Danish home will probably appear different from a colour-filled Spanish or French home. We use muted colours to create our famous hygge, and add bolder colours to create contrasts and personal splashes of colour in our homes. 

Thank you so much for telling us more about your home Michael! It's totally inspired me to start playing around with colour contrasts, how about you? 
See more pics of Michael's interior and fab style on instagram: @danskmode
Meanwhile, I'm off to find out more about the Strøm Collection and pieces by Helle Mardahl - they look fabulous! 
Is there anything that stands out to you?
We're busy packing for a half-term ski trip today (I always forget how much stuff there is to do before you go away - help! We're bound to forget something important too (we've forgotten my elder daughters' ski jacket two years in a row now, not popular! Bah!). 
I'll be nipping in tomorrow as I've got some super exciting news to share with you!!! 
Have a lovely evening, see you tomorrow!
Niki

Photography by Martin Solyst & Michael Schmidt
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The Fenix Palace – an exhibition by My Residence


During Stockholm design week there were exhibitions all over the city. Swedish interiors magazine My Residence curated an exhibition at the Fenix Palace in collaboration with Ariake and Wästerberg. The Fenix palace was a former entertainment space designed by Hjalmar Westerlund in 1912 . It housed a selection of restaurants, bowling alley, dance hall and theatre until it closed in 1940. Last year’s exhibition by My Residence, Ariake and Wästberg was all everyone could talk about. So you can imagine the anticipation to see what this years exhibit would be like. Of course it was beautiful. The exhibition was split into two rooms. One being very neutral and the other dark and dramatic. I chose to focus my pictures on the dark side, it drew me in. I don’t know what that says about me??…. Also my shots of the lighter room were incredibly orange, the wood vs lighting. It was nice but I much prefer the darker room. Products beautifully displayed included;The Ariake collection, who have collaborated with designers such as Norm Architects, Keiji Ashizawa, Staffan Holm and Andersson & Voll. Wästberg, Nedre Foss, and also part and the Faina Collection. h x All Photography/images © Hannah Trickett/Hannah in […]

The post The Fenix Palace – an exhibition by My Residence appeared first on Hannah In The House.


How to approach decorating a new-build home

Advertising – this is a paid partnership with David Wilson Homes, but all words and opinions are my own

How to approach decorating a new-build home | These Four Walls blog

A new-build property provides the perfect blank canvas for creating a home that’s a true reflection of you, your personality and your lifestyle. After all, you’re not inheriting anyone else’s tastes, and you won’t have any stressful structural works to contend with before you can start on the décor. But knowing where to begin can be daunting when you’re faced with plain walls and empty spaces. To help, I’ve teamed up with David Wilson Homes, one of the UK’s leading builders of high-quality housing, to share a few tips on how to approach decorating a new home.

Find your style

Before you start, think carefully about how you want your home to look and feel. What atmosphere do you want to create? What style of décor will make you feel happiest and most comfortable? Collect images, textures and materials that you’re drawn to and make a mood board that you can refer back to as the project progresses. Pinterest, Instagram and magazines are great sources of inspiration for this, but be realistic about what will work for you and remember that rooms shot for editorial purposes often don’t reflect day-to-day life. You might love the idea of a bohemian, vintage-inspired look, but it’s not going to work if, deep down, you know you can’t stand clutter.

Of course, one of the benefits of buying a new-build property is that you can choose many of the design features before you even move in. David Wilson’s ‘Expressions’ service, for example, lets you customise fixtures, fittings and finishes to suit your needs. It takes a lot of the hassle out of the design process, but make sure you think beyond fleeting trends and choose things that will stand the test of time.

How to approach decorating a new-build home | These Four Walls blog

How to approach decorating a new-build home | These Four Walls blog

Take your time with colour

Once you’ve decided on a style it can be tempting to rush into painting or wallpapering, but it’s not recommended during the first 12 months while your home will still be settling and drying out from the construction process. So, use this period to get a feel for the light and how it changes during the day, and have a think about what colours might work where. When the time does come to pick up a paintbrush, make sure you apply a test patch first, as the same shade can look very different depending on the direction in which a room faces. North-facing spaces tend to have bluish light, for example, while south-facing rooms get warmer, more golden light.

How to approach decorating a new-build home | These Four Walls blog

Play around with furniture and layout

Buying a new build means you won’t have any pre-conceived ideas of furniture arrangements from the previous occupants, so you have the opportunity to create a layout that works perfectly for your needs. Start by identifying what activities take place in your home and how you want to use each room. Would you like an area for dinner parties or family meals? Or a cosy nook where you can curl up with a book? Large open-plan spaces can seem particularly daunting, so think about how you could ‘zone’ them to create defined areas for different things.

Once you’ve done this, you can start creating a floorplan for each room (either with a pen and paper or a dedicated app). It helps to start with the largest and most essential item – the bed, the dining table, the sofa etc. It’s normally the biggest investment, and often the focal point for the whole space, so get that right and then position smaller pieces around it. But avoid the temptation to over-fill your home – you’ll want to leave enough space for people to move around freely.

How to approach decorating a new-build home | These Four Walls blog

How to approach decorating a new-build home | These Four Walls blog

Get the lighting right

Lighting has a huge impact on the way a space looks and feels, and it can make or break an interior-design scheme. Lighting generally falls into three categories: ambient lighting, which mimics daylight and illuminates the space as a whole; focused task lighting to help with certain activities; and accent lighting, which can be used to create pools of light or to highlight specific features. The great thing about a new build is that you can choose whether you want pendant lights or down lights, so think carefully about how you’ll use each space. Once you move in, you can then add floor and table lamps to complement the built-in lighting and create a cosy, relaxed feel. Seating and dining areas in particular often benefit from softer light sources that can be used in addition to or instead of the main overhead light to vary the mood.

How to approach decorating a new-build home | These Four Walls blog

Add colour and texture with accessories

Finally, don’t underestimate the power of smaller touches such as soft furnishings, artworks, plants, window dressings and vases. They really do help to set the tone of the space and they’re a great way to add instant colour and texture, long before you can start painting or papering. Just stay mindful of the finished look and feel you want to achieve (a mood board will come in very handy here) so that you don’t waste money on something that doesn’t work further down the line.

How to approach decorating a new-build home | These Four Walls blog

How to approach decorating a new-build home | These Four Walls blog

See David Wilson Homes for more advice on decorating a new-build property, including my tips on quick and easy ways to bring your home to life when you first move in.

Images four and nine by Abi Dare; all other photography via Shutterstock

The post How to approach decorating a new-build home appeared first on These Four Walls.


Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Apologies for the lack of new posts over the past week – I’ve been in Sweden, where I spent some time exploring Gothenburg and the west coast before heading to the capital for the Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair and the city’s annual Design Week. I’ll cover more of my trip soon, but I want to start with a look at the trends and product launches which I spotted at the fair – one of the biggest events in the Nordic design calendar, and an occasion that always leaves my head buzzing with new ideas.

Before I go any further, I have to stress that I really don’t think anyone should feel pressured to follow interior-design trends or change their decor according to what’s ‘in’ and what’s ‘out’. But I do think it’s worth keeping an eye on them, as you never know when they might provide unexpected inspiration. And the fair certainly wasn’t short on that, so without further ado here are just a few of the things that caught my eye…

Curvaceous seating

One of the first things I noticed was an abundance of sofas and armchairs with soft, rounded shapes. I’ve already covered a few of the spring-summer 2019 designs which tap into this trend – &tradition’s ‘Loafer’ series, Ferm Living’s ‘Rico’ chair and sofa, Menu’s ‘Tearoom’ collection – and it was great to view them in person. But the fair also saw some brand-new launches with curvaceous forms – most notably Swedish brand Fogia’s ‘Barba’ sofa and chair, which were designed by Andreas Engesvik and inspired by classic cartoon characters, and Copenhagen-based NORR11’s graceful, flowing ‘New Wave’ sofa.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

More discreet but no less beautiful was Fredericia’s ‘Calmo’ series, which was created by Hugo Passos and features subtly curved inner armrests.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Graphic lines and geometric shapes

Amid the sea of curves, there were also plenty of geometric forms and strong silhouettes, particularly when it came to chairs. My favourites were Finnish brand Artek’s stackable wooden ‘Atelier’ chair, created by TAF Studio for Stockholm’s newly refurbished Nationalmuseum, and Friends & Founders‘ striking monochrome ‘Novel’ chair and Bauhaus-inspired metal ‘FF’ chair.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

I also loved the stands of two brands known for their clean, graphic lines – String Furniture, which used the fair to showcase its new collection of outdoor shelving, and Design Of, which has extended its range of minimalist steel pieces with wine racks in various sizes.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Tactile fabrics

Another major trend was tactile fabrics – wonderfully snuggly bouclé, sumptuous velvets, textured cotton weaves. Corduroy is also making a bit of a comeback, and I spotted it on everything from cushions at Ferm Living to sofas at Woud. I was surprised by how much I liked the look of it, and it’s certainly a hard-wearing choice!

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Interestingly, a lot of the fabrics on show were made using recycled materials, and it was great to see sustainability playing such a big role in design. Both Ferm Living and Woud have new rug and cushion lines manufactured from plastic bottles, for example.

Japandi

The fusion of Scandinavian and Japanese design has been a growing trend for a while now, and there’s a definite synergy between the two traditions and their emphasis on simplicity, craftsmanship and natural materials. This year I spotted Japanese influences on all sorts of new pieces, including Woud’s ‘Array’ sideboards and NORR11’s ‘Oku’ coffee and dining tables, which take their name from the Japanese word for ‘oak’ and feature eye-catching rounded legs.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

The fair also saw the official launch of Motarasu, a new brand founded by Mikkel Zebitz to bring together Danish and Japanese designers. Its debut collection includes a daybed, a side chair, wall hooks, salad servers, a tray and more, all created to showcase the materials used and be as beautiful as they are functional.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

My favourite ‘Japandi’ find, though, was the new ‘Japanese Collection’ from Copenhagen-based Kristina Dam Studio, which features a serving board, a stackable tableware range called ‘Setonomo’, wooden relief carvings, spherical bowls, marble sculptures and more.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Sculptural lighting and accessories

Much of the new lighting on display featured sculptural forms and resembled works of art as much as anything else. My favourite was Nuura’s new ‘Apiales’ chandelier, which was inspired by the wild umbellifers which grew around the cottage of designer Sofie Refer’s grandparents. It comes in black and brass variants, and features clusters of glass spheres which unfold like a blossoming flower.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

I also loved the ‘Ware’ table lamp, created by MSDS Studio for New Works. Designed to bring together two distinct flowing forms into a single object, it looks like a pair of shells huddled together on the shore. It’s available in white and grey, and I was very taken by the way the rounded front hides the lighting diffuser and allows a soft glow to swell up from within.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

The same sculptural elegance applied to many of the new accessories on show, too. I particularly liked Christian Mohaded’s stainless-steel ‘Ripply’ candleholder, also for New Works. It was inspired by ripples on the surface of a glassy lake and looks stunning even without candles.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Beige tones and earthy colours

Beige was the predominant shade on many of the stands and it certainly seems to be the neutral of choice this year. And if you think it’s boring, think again – the soft, nature-inspired tones of sand, taupe, cream and off-white created a calming, refined look and worked brilliantly with a huge variety of furniture and accessories.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

When stronger shades were used, there was a predominance of browns, oranges, rust reds and mustard yellows, giving an earthy 1970s vibe – something that’s evident in many of the above photos, and in the below examples from the stands of Kristina Dam, &tradition and Swedish rug company Kasthall.

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair | These Four Walls blog

Many of the above trends also popped up at the Design Week events held in Stockholm to coincide with the fair – more on those to follow in a future post!

Images nine, 10, 12-19 and 37-41 by Abi Dare; all other photography via the brands named above

The post Trends & launches from the Stockholm Furniture Fair appeared first on These Four Walls.


A Charming White and Natural Family Home In Normandy, France

Cosy, warm, natural, très belle - these are just a few words I would use to describe this delightful French home in Manche, Normandy. While the interior world is adding colour to the walls one room at a time, Flo of blog J'aurais pu m'appeler Marcel is sticking to her white canvas - and it's a great reminder that white can be family-friendly and warm! Often seen as a Nordic trick of the trade, Flo has added lots of texture to offset the cooler white backdrop. From market bags, wooden furniture, simple sheets thrown over the sofa and fluffy rugs to beautiful vintage pieces that tell a story - it's obvious that the home of  Flo, Sieg and their three children Lilou, Gabriel and Jude is here to be lived in and enjoyed!

Flo has a basket bag for every occasion and they make a wonderful display in the kitchen. Source a similar array here*
A glass partition creates a divide between the kitchen and sitting room without stemming the flow of light. I've been thinking of doing something similar in my kitchen ever since seeing it in Zoé De La Cases beautiful vintage-inspired country home. What do you think?
Replacing the cabinet door under the sink with a simple linen curtain* is a great way to add a relaxed, cottage feel to a kitchen and make everything feel that bit softer, while a 'barely there' round jute rug* protects the floor. 
Everyone needs a little alone time in a larger family (trust me, I know!) - and this corner seat is ideal for listening to records (on a very cute Crossley player*). I always think kids are a little like cats though - they always seem to get to the cosiest spot in the house first and look so content you can't bare to move them *rolls eyes*!!

Despite the simple white theme, the sitting room has a super cosy touch thanks to the layers of texture which include a Beni Ourain rug*, sheepskin throw and striped cushions.

Jude's room features the only real pop of colour in the house - a half wall painted in a dusty rose (or 'mellinial pink' as it has become known!) and an armoire painted in Farrow & Ball Stone Blue.  
Tip: choose a rug you love (this one is from Monoprix -  and I also like this one seen in Olivia's cute bedroom) and then create the room around it, picking out the different accent colours. It's a simple, yet great way to create a cohesive look. 
The school desk and chair were a vintage find (there's a load of vintage school furniture available here*). 
On the opposite side of the room, a ladder leading up to the top of Ivar cabinets creates a cosy place for the kids to sit and play (remember to always nail furniture like this to the wall, just to be on the safe side!). I love the swans (similar also seen in this beautiful home) - I've written a little note to Flo to find out where they're from and will hopefully come back soon!

What a delightful home, don't you think? There's something so charming about the relaxed, simplicity of it.

Did you come away with the same feeling?

See more snapshots of this home on Flo's fab blog and instagram @jauraispumappelermarcel.

Oh and more French homes I love (where do I even start with this, there have been so many lately!?)  include: the wonderful home of a French stylist, the playful home of a French photographer and a serene home in Normandy, France.

Wishing you a happy hump day (yep, the phrase still not doing it for me!!).

Niki

Photography; Flo / @jauraispumappelermarcel


5 Ways To Turn Your Home Into a Sanctuary

Weekend House by Gafpa architects

Whenever I visit interior fairs, I always intend to take it a little more easy, put my feet up here and there. And then I get there and there's so much to see and feel inspired by I end up running around like crazy and arrive at the press happy hour totally disheveled (and in desperate need of a glass or two!). Perhaps it was ironic then, that my favourite trend forecast at the wonderful Ambiente Fair - which focuses on international consumer goods - in Frankfurt this weekend was 'Quiet Surrounding'. Annetta Palmisano, Cem Bora and Claudia Herk picked this out as one of three 2019 trends alongside 'tasteful residence' and 'joyfilled ambience' - all of which have an underlying theme of sustainability, naturalness and recycling (hurrah!).

Noma restaurant, Copenhagen

So what is 'quiet surrounding' all about?

"Simply beautiful: natural, simple and useful products satisfying a yearning for calm and honesty. They create in soft colours unpretentious havens for everyday life free from stress. Respect for materials and creativity in the use made of them are of great importance here."

Sounds good to me - and something very close to my 'scandinavian heart', how about you? But how do we tap into this trend and create our very own sanctuary far from the stresses and strains of everyday life? Here are 5 simple steps:

1. Colour:
Think about introducing soothing, earthy, muted colours inspired by nature to your home. Walls, textiles and accessories in 'green moss', stormy sea' and rose dawn' are bound to help you lower your pulse and create a dreamy haven!

Pantone 466 C Pantone 16-09460 / Pantone 11-1001 TCX Cream Pink / Pantone 5655 C 16-6307 Agate Grey / Pantone 2177 C - 18-4711 Stormy Sea / Pantone 451 C 17-0636 Green Moss / Pantone 7504 18-1029 Toasted coconut / Pantone 7612 C 16-1522 TCX Rose dawn / Pantone 426 C 19-4006 TCX Caviar






Mark's 'Memories / Bigso notebook 

2. Natural materials:
This season is all about natural, honest, sustainable materials and are "combined with a love of experimentation and traditional handcraft techniques". Furniture and accessories in wood, stone, glass, paper and wool with a handcrafted finish will help you to reconnect with nature.

Uashmama washable paper bags

The beautiful patina from different types of respectful, handcrafted items made from wood tell a story and add to the warm and inviting, ultra cosy feel of the home. Plus they'll just get better with time!

Wooden Hanger by Aveva Design, Serving Boards by Stuff Design

3. Textiles
Linen tea towels, bedding, knitted dishcloths and blankets not only make you feel super comfy so you can relax anywhere in your home - but they also help to dampen noise for a calmer abode! OK, and they look pretty too!

Aspegren dish cloths, LinenMe Tea Towels and Lovely Linen towels





4. Plants and flowers
I always find it incredible how quickly you can be in the moment and unwind when surrounded by nature. Think about the last time you are in a forest, a meadow, the local park or walking along the beach - everyday concerns seem, to disappear (even if for a short time). It makes sense then, that bringing plants and flowers into your home are an instant mood lifter - and an essential part of our 'oasis'!

Climbing plants in the Stockholm home of Karolina Modig
Uashmama paper bag plant pot / Wooden vases by Danish Made By Bent

5. Wildlife
You might be lucky enough to have a wonderful furry friend rocking about the house, but for the rest of us pet-less folk - bringing wildlife indoors can help to complete your oasis! And I'm not talking about the two homing pigeons that made themselves at home in my bedroom last summer (I'm still worrying they'll be back again this year!). Search for beautiful Danish bird-shaped ornaments and nature-inspired art.  Or go a step further with an indoor 'Zwitscherbox' bird house with sensor chip: every time you walk past, the birds start to sing!

Finnish Illustrations by Teemu Järvi / wooden birds by Novoform
I'm feeling pretty inspired by this trend, I have to say - and was so excited to discover some of these items at the fair. I hope some of these ideas will help inspire you to make small changes to create your very own sanctuary at home too! 
Tweet tweet
Niki
PS you can hear about other news from Ambiente fair over on their blog here
Note: My trip to Ambiente fair was a paid press trip. All words are my own. 

The Charming Swedish Home of a Plant and Flea Market Enthusiast

Malin Brostad loves gardening. In fact, she loves plants and flowers in general. The borders in the garden of her pretty, classic yellow and white house in Hässelby, Western Stockholm are bursting with fox gloves, ferns, roses and other species hardy enough to withstand the Northern climate. In the winter, more sensitive shrubs are brought inside and rest on shelving, vintage tables and credenzas alongside climbers, monstera and coleus as well as treasures picked up at flea markets. It's hard not to fall in love with Malin's charming home - which she shares with husband Markus and their children Ville (10) and Vidar (7). Välkommen in!

My parents-in-law have had a climber like this around their window for decades - and I appreciate it every time I visit. In Malin's home, it makes a feature of the window - and adds a green feel even when there are no leaves on the trees outside. (See my guide to indoor climbing plants if you're curious to do something similar!).

A classic danish Stoff candleholder* can be glimpsed amid the urban jungle atop a mid-century side table*.  I remember seeing the same candleholder in Karolina Modig's Stockholm home (another plant enthusiast!).

I cheated a little here and am sharing a photo which Malin took at another time (which explains why it's not the same arrangement seen in the photo above it!). I couldn't resist though, as I love the lions head and gallery wall and thought you might too! 
Kim Kardashian is not the only who can break the internet. The incredible coleus seen in the corner of the family dining area (and in Malin's arms below!) caused a stir on instagram in 2018! I can totally see why, how about you?!

In the winter, there's one geranium for every step! 
There's so much to love about Malin's bedroom - the A-frame ceilings, the vintage chair, the plants, the soft teal wall colour (by Jotun), the apricot linen duvet cover*. Isn't it pretty?!

Looking at the exterior of Malin's Swedish home - it's hard not to dream about moving to the suburbs of Stockholm, does anyone else feel the same?!
Failing that, this home has taught me that there's absolutely nothing stopping me from bringing more plants into my homes. I love how a coleus like Malin's adds a burst of colour to the room too - perfect! 
Is there anything that stands out to you? 
See more snaps of Malin's lovely home over on her instagram @malinbrostad - and other Swedish homes with pretty outdoor spaces here, here and here
I've just returned from a great weekend in Frankfurt where I attended Ambiente Fair. It was a bit of a flyby tour and I'm feeling sooooo tired this morning (cue - 'kids, can you fix your own breakfast today'?!) but it was super inspiring too! If you'd like to take a peek at the latest trends, I recorded this interview with the Ambiente Facebook Live (eeek!) team on Saturday.  
Have a wonderful start to the week!
Niki
Photography: Malin Brostad, shared with kind permission.
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